This May be the Best Cartridge Weapon for Any Survival Situation…

rifle ammo

If you hunt at all, you are likely familiar the 45-70 cartridge and are aware of the devastating impact it can have on game, even big game.

Originally developed for the “trapdoor” Springfield rifle, it has been used for over 125 years and has felled game ranging from “varmints” to elephants.

Its reliability and versatility is well documented and is so revered that it has served as a munition-of-choice for the US Army, big game hunters, explorers and small game hunters worldwide.

Its only drawback its range, but if you are hunting in brush or need a monster punch at point blank range, the 45-70 is tough to beat.

In a survival situation, it would be difficult to find ammunition that better-served hunting needs for all game, primarily because its reputation is that it does not destroy meat upon impact.

To learn more about the 45-70, check out the next page.

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75 Comments

  1. Chrispy Pfaffenrot said:

    Or you could put a slug barrel on your mossberg like a normal person. A friend of mine hunts with a .375 H&H and swears by it, it’s a great gun and round, will drop anything right there and then too, but both of these rifles are a waste of powder and hard to find ammo for in an extended survival scenario

  2. Burt Gummerfan said:

    Depends on the load. Some of the Springfield-safe, cowboy, or black powder equivalent loads are powderpuffs. Garrett or Buffalo Bore, not so much!

  3. Chris Dargie said:

    The 45-70 to is a great caliber.. People can say what they want bout it but there is a reason it’s been around for so long.. I love my Henry. Its got the power you an take down anything with it. Max effective range 300yrds? For a Straight cartridge its the best in my book.

  4. Steve Coffman said:

    I suppose I should be somewhat flattered really but it’s a short article and they copied like half of it for their second page quote.

  5. Ken Townsend said:

    The .45-70 is a fantastic round. It will put down most creatures of any continent. In a survival situation though you have to consider size and weight constraints. If$#%&!@*ever actually hits the fan you have to accept you might have to travel on foot. How much .45-70 can you carry 20 miles with the rest of your gear? How much .308 could you take instead? Twice as much? How much 5.56 could you carry? 4 times as much?

  6. Chrispy Pfaffenrot said:

    Ken Townsend he’s a machinist and a master blacksmith with a shop and massive stockpile out on his homestead in rural Wisconsin so that’s prob less of an issue, but yeah I didn’t realize they were that pricey. I got to shoot it a few times, really cool gun, but waaay too big for me to own one, flat shooters are the way to go in rifles, in my opinion. If you have a giant round nose bullet that drops like that, I’d rather have the 12gauge.

  7. Tyler Barnes said:

    I’ve seen those little guns Kyle that’s really cool rails all over it. Cool rifle!

  8. Timmy Crouch said:

    Tried and true, nobody can argue with the 45-70. But for survival or bug out situation you have to decide what is good to carry on foot. A hundred rounds of 5.56 is comparable to 20 rounds of 45-70. Or 12ga and 30-06 are common and a greater chance to stumble across extra rounds while scavenging a homesite. There are tons of choices

  9. Matthew Dowe said:

    I am a fan of the .45-70 government. But that being said I think a good 12 gauge or 20 gauge shotgun would be a better choice. You would get about as much range with a slug, especially if you have a rifled barreled 20 gauge with sabots. On top of that you can get any shot size for a multitude of other game. Sure you could make a birdshot load for the .45-70 if you took the time to reload them. But when you compare the case of shotgun shells to manufactured .45-70, or even reloading supplies for it you see the shotgun owns it in affordability. Finally look at the firearms themselves. A Marlin or Winchester (or clone there of) or even a Henry steel model will all cost $700 and up. You could definitely spend as much or far more on a shotgun, but you can also get a Mossberg 500 for about $250. All in all the shotgun has a lot going for it in terms of survival weapon and food provider.

  10. Chris Nichols said:

    Lot of meat damage for small game. Good brush cutter. Out west in the open county, flat shooters with distance takes preference.

  11. Jeff Pope said:

    my choice Marlin 1897 45-70 , 22 inch barrel, literally dropped 2 elk in CO. and I mean dropped not 1 step. MY next will be a 458 socom

  12. Steve Merkley said:

    The 45/70 has put more food on the table and put down more men then any other cartage

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